Ground Care / Landscaping


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Farm land preparing for diversification

Not surprisingly, there are various legal issues that need to be considered by landowners before embarking upon your diversification scheme. Johanne Spittle FALA and head of litigation at Ware & Kay solicitors explains that top of your list should be checking whether there are any restrictions that might limit possible use of your land and access to it.  

Access

It is common for farms and agricultural land to be accessed along private roads or tracks. If use of his road is required for the diversification project, for example to access the proposed farm shop or your commercial development, it will be necessary to establish ownership of the road or rights granted over it at the outset.

If access is required over a road or track that is owned by a neighbouring landowner and over which you have been granted a right of way you will need to ascertain whether there are any limitations on use, for example if use is restricted to agricultural use, and whether there are any other obligations that apply such as maintenance or an obligation not to cause nuisance, annoyance or disturbance to that neighbouring landowner. Similarly, you may own the road but others may have rights over it that might be affected by your increased use. 

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Caroline Hawcroft on Renewable Diversification of Agricultural Land

Despite the USA’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreements, the rest of the western world remains committed to tackling climate change and continuing to invest in forms of energy production, which do not contribute to greenhouse gas emissions.

Currently, around 30% of the UK’s energy production is from renewable sources, second only to gas. The main sources of this green energy are, of course, from wind, hydro-electric power, solar, and to a lesser extent from anaerobic digestion and heat pumps. Although capacity for renewable energy production is increasing year-on-year, with 69% of UK land currently used for agricultural purposes, there is clearly room to go further, and for the farming community to play a role in delivering the much-sought carbon neutral future.

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Prepping your Land for the Season Ahead
Prepping Your Land for the Season Ahead

It’s official: spring has (almost) sprung. Temperatures have been feeling considerably warmer and more spring-like lately – but before the first buds begin to appear, you need to start prepping your land.

So, no matter if you’re a farm or smallholdings owner – or a groundskeeper for a school, golf club or estate – here’s how to shake off the winter coat and get ready for the working season ahead…

Walk the grounds

Before starting anything else, the first step is to walk the grounds and check what needs doing – making a list of any maintenance issues or repairs that need to be carried out so you can prioritise the most pressing ones. Areas to inspect include borders and fencing, outbuildings and livestock housing. You should note down any areas that need reseeding as well.